Ripening Trick?

Discussion in 'Advanced Techniques' started by emilya, Dec 19, 2018.

  1. emilya

    emilya Future Dispensary Owner

    I am curious if any of my friends have tried this trick...

    I am told that large grow ops will move the lights up quite a ways away from the plants in the last few weeks, to simulate the fall sun losing its intensity. Apparently it makes for a faster ripening? It makes sense... anyone here ever had the room to try it, or reduced intensity of the light to simulate it?
     
  2. Pupp

    Pupp Registered+

    I don't know if that would actually make much difference or not. Sounds like something you might want to try, out of curiosity. There's a lot more play going on when the sun gets lower in the horizon as the days get shorter. Much more red light waves and less blue light waves.
    Yet, in the tropics, where sativa reigns supreme, plants can take 4 solid months of the flowering phase. I've always assumed it was because they get about 12 hours of daylight for their entire growing season. -I looked up Malawi Gold for an example of a tropical strain with a long growing period.
     
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  3. irydyum

    irydyum Registered+

    As someone who has literally toured a hundred large, legal grow ops, I've never seen this one. I half expected this to be the cold water/ice trick, or 48 hours of darkness when I read the thread title.

    I've had my light meter out in the winter, mid December, in Colorado. Even then on a sunny day I was getting readings of 1800 ppfd. I don't think an indoor light putting off 800-1000 ppfd being raised up is going to mimic anything found in nature. Just my two pennies from observation.

    As far as the equatorial sativa is concerned, the long flowering really has nothing to do with the daylight. It's theorized that in full intensity outdoor sunlight that plants can grow adequately with 5-6 hours of direct intense light, and the rest can be overcast/cloudy. It's more about the dark period. Equatorial sativas take longer to flower because they can essentially. As you follow the evolution of cannabis away from the equator, the flowering time shortens, plants take a different shape, leaves broaden, and they express different terpene profiles. This is all a result of evolutionary adaptation. So, Indica plants have short flowering times, stout plants with fat leaves, and tons of trichromes to protect them. They have a shorter flowering time because they have to.
     
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  4. Pupp

    Pupp Registered+

    After I thought about it some more, I came to the same conclusion. If one prefers faster ripening, they should just use a shorter vegetation cycle and make up for the smaller harvest with either more plants, or use a strain with a shorter flowering cycle. It's impossible to mimic the sun and the seasons.
     
  5. emilya

    emilya Future Dispensary Owner

    yet so many pictures you see of large grow rooms, especially notable in LED operations, the lights are crazy far away from the plants. This trick, as it was explained to me, is the explanation of those pictures.
     
  6. irydyum

    irydyum Registered+

    Large grow rooms being the differentiator. Not arguing at all with what was explained to you, no idea who said it or what picture or any other variables for that matter. Just trying to share first hand experience. LED's is where you see the most diversity because there is much more diversity in how they deliver photons to plants. HPS is fairly typical across the board with a few exceptions.

    At scale (over 100 lights), for instance, I will go directly to a lighting manufacturer and bypass distribution. When I do that, I can specify a lighting intensity that I desire to deliver to my canopy. They then do a computer model of light spacing and mounting height for me. That way they can guarantee they meet my spec. There is no "one size" solution and metrics like there are with a home grow of 2 lights. First hand experience of measuring in commercial grows, I can tell you I've seen everything in a flower room from 400-1400 ppfd at canopy level. Personally, I like to flower under 800-1000 ppfd @ 78-80F 45%RH 800ppm CO2 and 1200-1500 ppm nutrient concentration. Generally speaking and depending on substrate.

    Every grower has their preference and reasons for what they do. Much like cooking a steak, many ways to git 'er done, all are delicious, but no two chefs are exactly the same.

    Cheers!
    Iry
     
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  7. Pupp

    Pupp Registered+

    Maybe your thinking of the large scale grow rooms, industrial scale, where the entire room is engineered to help cannabis plants grow. It's one thing to be a small potatoes, but it's a whole new ball game when the operation has startup budget in the millions of dollars.

    The state has been widening a road to 4 lanes, a few miles from where I live. They're widening both in the city and between the city and the interstate. Anyway, for the part going through town, they installed LED street lights. There's only 5 LED diodes per street light, but the amount of light it produces is insane. Think of industrial grow rooms using LED's on that intensity scale. There's little need for the lamps to be on top of the plants with that amount of light.
     
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  8. irydyum

    irydyum Registered+

    I'm assuming this was at me, and yes, I'm absolutely referring to large scale industrial grow rooms. I understood that the original post was referring to the same. You're right, it's a much different animal, and having experience across the spectrum that was what I was trying to reinforce.

    I can also promise you that the LARGEST in the industry, are not the best cultivators. Time and time again I read about companies with market caps over $1B having total failures. TOTAL failures. One in BC that was 500,000 square feet recently comes to mind. Skill > Money.

    Iry
     
  9. Pupp

    Pupp Registered+

    It was directed at Emily I'd say the average reader of the forum, when thinking about grow rooms, have a vision where it's owned by a single mom and pop dispensary, unless qualified as an industrial grow.

    In any event, I suspect after federal legalization, and one could ship weed to any state, outdoor grows will replace a good chunk of the indoor variety, as far as stuff you buy at a dispensary.

    Not to say large scale commercial indoor grows will go away, but I think for the large scale industrial indoor stuff, those businesses will probably invest a lot in outdoor grows too, and use the indoor plants on a more seasonal basis.
     
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  10. emilya

    emilya Future Dispensary Owner

    I am working to become part of a large grow op here in Missouri as soon as the laws get into place. We are supposed to have one grow op to support every 100,000 people in the state of Missouri and 24 dispensaries for each of the 8 congressional districts. There are going to be a lot of large scale operations springing into place soon, and I would like to go into my negotiations with these people and their backers, with as much good information as I can. It is already becoming abundantly clear that most of these people have absolutely no idea what they are doing.
     
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  11. irydyum

    irydyum Registered+

    Preach Em.

    All I can say is someone who can cultivate plants is as valuable as their 2 hands... Someone who can cultivate talent though is a whole different story. Growing plants is one part of the equation, effectively leading a team toward the same vision is the trickier part. If I can do anything to help out, don't hesitate. I'm a man of my word after all...

    Happy holidays!!
    Iry
     
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